My talk on React

This is a talk I gave for a local Meetup about React. It is called ‘Why I like React’. I cover the basics of building React components. Then I spend some time talking about functional programming. Finally I wrap it all together to show how React is functional in nature. The final demo shows how to ‘think in React’.
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Node.js, Socket.io, and Redis: Intermediate Tutorial – React (Screencast)

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Screencast

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Node.js, Socket.io, and Redis: Intermediate Tutorial – React

Download the src(github)
View the demo

Blog Post Series

I want to spend a little time going into React and I felt that this would make the previous a little too long and meandering (almost like this sentence). In this post we will cover what React is, how it is different, what it excels at, how to implement it into a current application, and how to test React views. There is a lot of ground to cover so let’s get started.

What is React

React is a new library for building user interfaces (to steal it directly from their site) developed by Facebook. React is not a full featured JavaScript application framework. This means it is not competing in the same space as Angular, Ember, Backbone or <insert your favorite framework that I am not mentioning here>. It also means it does not care how you route, where you get your data, or any application plumbing. It will render HTML.

Why use React?

Why use React if all it does is render HTML? Continue reading “Node.js, Socket.io, and Redis: Intermediate Tutorial – React”

Node.js, Socket.io, and Redis: Intermediate Tutorial – Client side

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We will begin by managing our dependencies. Let’s get started.

Bower

Bower is a package manager like npm. In much the same way as npm, Bower needs Node.js and runs on top of it. While npm focuses on packages for Node.js, Bower usually targets front-end libraries like jQuery and React. Managing front-end libraries is much better than the old way of just downloading a version and sticking it in our project. We now have full version control.

Bower uses a configuration file named bower.json. Here is that file for our project. Continue reading “Node.js, Socket.io, and Redis: Intermediate Tutorial – Client side”